Nanai Cicada on the Namosi and Navosa Province, Fiji.

Latest version published by NatureFiji-MareqetiViti on Sep 27, 2018 NatureFiji-MareqetiViti

Raiateana knowlesi; a species that is known to emerge once every 8 years. This species is known from only a handful of locations within the Namosi and Navosa Province.The cicada only develops its wings in its last life stage, as it emerges out of the ground and removes its hard casing. In Fiji, Cicadas are generally known as ‘makā’. Only the Fijian cicada (R. knowlesi) is called the “nanai”.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 58 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 58 records in English (6 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in English (12 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (11 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tikoca S, Naivalu S, Waqa K, Segaidina M (2018): Nanai Cicada on the Namosi and Navosa Province, Fiji.. v1. NatureFiji-MareqetiViti. Dataset/Occurrence. https://ipt.sprep.org/resource?r=namosinanaidata&v=1.0

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is NatureFiji-MareqetiViti. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 329c9f4f-13eb-4a69-9c56-09923e394dcf.  NatureFiji-MareqetiViti publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

Keywords

Occurrence; Observation

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Siteri Tikoca
Conservation Officer
NatureFiji- MareqetiViti Not applicable Suva FJ
Simione Naivalu
Intern
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Not applicable Suva FJ
Kalisi Waqa
Intern
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Suva FJ
Melania Segaidina
Conservation Officer
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Suva FJ

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Siteri Tikoca
Conservation Officer
NatureFiji- MareqetiViti Not applicable Suva FJ

Who filled in the metadata:

Theresa Rakai
Intern
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Suva FJ

Who else was associated with the resource:

Point Of Contact
Chris Simon
Professor
University of Connecticut US
Point Of Contact
Siteri Tikoca
Conservation Officer
NatureFiji- MareqetiViti 249 Rewa Street, Suva, Fiji Suva FJ
Programmer
Anisof So'o
Programmer
Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia WS

Geographic Coverage

The data collected is situated on the largest island of Fiji, Viti Levu under the provinces of Navosa (17.9865° S, 177.6581° E) and Namosi (18.0864° S, 178.1291° E).

Bounding Coordinates South West [-19.187, -178.572], North East [-15.644, 176.572]

Taxonomic Coverage

Fijian endemic cicada that emerges once every eight years. Species Raiateana knowlesi (Fijian cicada), "nanai" as natively known in Fiji.

Species  Raiateana knowlesi (Fijian cicada)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2017-09-01 / 2017-11-17

Project Data

Previously recorded from the village of Matokana in the Navosa Province and then in the Garrick Forest reserve in Namosi in 2009, the emergence showed the distribution of the Fijian Cicada.

Title Nanai Cicada on the Namosi and Navosa Province, Fiji.
Funding NatureFiji-MareqetiViti members and John Burns
Study Area Description The provinces of Navosa and Namosi in Viti Levu, Fiji Islands.
Design Description It was vital to record the call of the Nanai and to take a sample of Nanai.

The personnel involved in the project:

Point Of Contact
Siteri Tikoca

Sampling Methods

-Record the Call of the Nanai: Use the Bug Bag 1. Place bag over an emerging Nanai 2. Capture adult 3. Take to a quiet place and record the call -Sample of Nanai 1. Recently crawled out nymph 2. Recently abandoned shell 3. Emerging adult 4. Recently emerged adult 5. Full adult - Note the Habitat and vegetation type as well as its time and date of emergence,mating, eggs hatching, when the Nanai started crawling out of the ground, when they started singing and when they died.

Study Extent Recorded from Matokana in the Navosa Province and then in the Garrick Forest reserve in Namosi as well as Wainiyavu and Mareniamu village in the Navosa Province in Viti Levu, Fiji.
Quality Control •Tight seal vials were used and 95% Ethanol for specimens •1L beaker/2L soda bottle with top section cut off at and a 1L measure mark (to measure soil volume) •Sample nymphs once or twice a year using a standard protocol.

Method step description:

  1. Directions for Digging •Find locations where last emergence was most dense •Check branches of trees for egg scars •If you find egg scars, start digging below that area/branch •Identify the tree species at which you found egg scars • Cut through squares of Earth with the blade of the shovel and carefully pull up the soil nymphs can be found within 30cm of the surface, but they can be found deeper. Directions to set up plot i.Create square meter plots under the trees with egg nests ii.Label with a permanent label and stake at each corner iii.Enrich these plots with hatching Cicada from an adjacent area iv.Count the number of egg nests. Place a quantity of twigs in a pile inside each plot. The eggs will hatch, nymphs will jump out of the branches and crawl into the ground. v.Create replicate plots with different densities of nymphs. vi.Sample nymphs once or twice a year using a standard protocol. vii.Compare nymphal growth rates under different density conditions. Alternatively, all plots can be supplemented with the same densities of nymphs, increasing the density of egg nests in a plot will increase the probability of finding nymphs in that plot in later years.

Additional Metadata

Link to the legend of the "nanai": https://naturefiji.org/legend-of-the-nanai/

Alternative Identifiers https://ipt.sprep.org/resource?r=namosinanaidata